Governor

Governor
   1) Heb. nagid, a prominent, conspicuous person, whatever his capacity: as, chief of the royal palace (2 Chr. 28:7; comp. 1 Kings 4:6), chief of the temple (1 Chr. 9:11; Jer. 20:1), the leader of the Aaronites (1 Chr. 12:27), keeper of the sacred treasury (26:24), captain of the army (13:1), the king (1 Sam. 9:16), the Messiah (Dan. 9:25).
   2) Heb. nasi, raised; exalted. Used to denote the chiefs of families (Num. 3:24, 30, 32, 35); also of tribes (2:3; 7:2; 3:32). These dignities appear to have been elective, not hereditary.
   3) Heb. pakid, an officer or magistrate. It is used of the delegate of the high priest (2 Chr. 24:11), the Levites (Neh. 11:22), a military commander (2 Kings 25:19), Joseph's officers in Egypt (Gen. 41:34).
   4) Heb. shallit, one who has power, who rules (Gen. 42:6; Ezra 4:20; Eccl. 8:8; Dan. 2:15; 5:29).
   5) Heb. aluph, literally one put over a thousand, i.e., a clan or a subdivision of a tribe. Used of the "dukes" of Edom (Gen. 36), and of the Jewish chiefs (Zech. 9:7).
   6) Heb. moshel, one who rules, holds dominion. Used of many classes of rulers (Gen. 3:16; 24:2; 45:8; Ps. 105:20); of the Messiah (Micah 5:2); of God (1 Chr. 29:12; Ps. 103:19).
   7) Heb. sar, a ruler or chief; a word of very general use. It is used of the chief baker of Pharaoh (Gen. 40:16); of the chief butler (40:2, etc. See also Gen. 47:6; Ex. 1:11; Dan. 1:7; Judg. 10:18; 1 Kings 22:26; 20:15; 2 Kings 1:9; 2 Sam. 24:2). It is used also of angels, guardian angels (Dan. 10:13, 20, 21; 12:1; 10:13; 8:25).
   8) Pehah, whence pasha, i.e., friend of the king; adjutant; governor of a province (2 Kings 18:24; Isa. 36:9; Jer. 51: 57; Ezek. 23:6, 23; Dan. 3:2; Esther 3: 12), or a perfect (Neh. 3:7; 5:14; Ezra 5:3; Hag. 1:1). This is a foreign word, Assyrian, which was early adopted into the Hebrew idiom (1 Kings 10:15).
   9) The Chaldean word segan is applied to the governors of the Babylonian satrapies (Dan. 3:2, 27; 6:7); the prefects over the Magi (2:48). The corresponding Hebrew word segan is used of provincial rulers (Jer. 51:23, 28, 57); also of chiefs and rulers of the people of Jerusalem (Ezra 9:2; Neh. 2:16; 4:14, 19; 5:7, 17; 7:5; 12:40).
   In the New Testament there are also different Greek words rendered thus.
   1) Meaning an ethnarch (2 Cor. 11:32), which was an office distinct from military command, with considerable latitude of application.
   2) The procurator of Judea under the Romans (Matt. 27:2). (Comp. Luke 2:2, where the verb from which the Greek word so rendered is derived is used.)
   3) Steward (Gal. 4:2).
   4) Governor of the feast (John 2:9), who appears here to have been merely an intimate friend of the bridegroom, and to have presided at the marriage banquet in his stead.
   5) A director, i.e., helmsman; Lat. gubernator, (James 3:4).

Easton's Bible Dictionary. . 1897.

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  • Governor — Gov ern*or, n. [OE. governor, governour, OF. governeor, F. gouverneur, fr. L. gubernator steersman, ruler, governor. See {Govern}.] 1. One who governs; especially, one who is invested with the supreme executive authority in a State; a chief ruler …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • governor — gov‧er‧nor [ˈgʌvnə ǁ ərnər] noun [countable] 1. JOBS FINANCE the person in charge of an important organization such as a country s central bank: • the governor of the Bank of England 2. a member of the committee in control of an institution such …   Financial and business terms

  • governor — gov·er·nor / gə vər nər/ n: one that governs: as a: one that exercises authority esp. over an area or group b: an official elected or appointed to act as ruler, chief executive, or nominal head of a political unit; specif: the chief executive of… …   Law dictionary

  • governor — c.1300, gouernour, personal keeper, protector, guide, from O.Fr. governeor (11c., Mod.Fr. gouverneur) and directly from L. gubernatorem (nom. gubernator) director, ruler, governor, originally steersman, pilot (see GOVERN (Cf. govern)). Meaning… …   Etymology dictionary

  • governor — [guv′ə nər, guv′ərnər] n. [ME governour < OFr governeor < L gubernator, a pilot, steersman, governor] 1. a person who governs; esp., a) a person appointed to govern a dependency, province, town, fort, etc. ☆ b) the elected head of any state …   English World dictionary

  • Governor — (engl., spr. gowwĕrnĕr), s. Gouverneur …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • governor — [n] person administrating government administrator, boss, chief, chief of state, commander, comptroller, controller, director, executive, gubernatorial leader, guv*, head, head honcho*, leader, manager, overseer, presiding officer, ruler,… …   New thesaurus

  • governor — ► NOUN 1) an official appointed to govern a town or region. 2) the elected executive head of a US state. 3) the representative of the British Crown in a colony or in a Commonwealth state that regards the monarch as head of state. 4) the head of a …   English terms dictionary

  • Governor — For other uses, see governor (disambiguation). A governor (from French gouverneur) is a governing official, usually the executive (at least nominally, to different degrees also politically and administratively) of a non sovereign level of… …   Wikipedia

  • governor — /guv euhr neuhr, euh neuhr/, n. 1. the executive head of a state in the U.S. 2. a person charged with the direction or control of an institution, society, etc.: the governors of a bank; the governor of a prison. 3. Also called governor general.… …   Universalium

  • governor —    Probably the most frequent use of this term is in various parts of Britain, where working class men use it to address another man, usually one who is unknown to them. In his book The Cockney, Julian Franklyn writes:    ‘Guv’ner’, generally so… …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

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